Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement
Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement
Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement
University of California
Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement

Germplasm Assembly Team

Inputs:

Walnut germplasm maintained at the USDA-ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository, Davis, CA and the Missouri Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center, New Franklin, MO.

Activities:

Generate, propagate, and curate open-pollinated (OP) and hybrid seedlings and clones.  Coordinate w/ phenotyping and genetic mapping teams.

Outputs:

OP and interspecific hybrid seedling and clonal plants; publications describing propagation technologies.

Short Term Outcomes:

Utilization of germplasm for disease resistance evaluations; development of rootstock breeding populations and technologies.

Long Term Outcomes:

Commercial availability of clonal rootstock selections; nursery adoption of clonal rootstock propagation technologies.

Impact:

Walnut nursery and orchard industries stimulated by  new propagation technologies and superior rootstocks.

Workflow Chart

Germplasm Team Workflow 1
Germplasm Team Workflow

Team Members

Team Leader:
Chuck Leslie

Chuck Leslie
Chuck Leslie
Malli Aradhya
Malli Aradhya
Wes Hackett
Wes Hackett
John Preece
John Preece

for member profiles: People

 

Mapping genetic loci

We will identify the genetic loci which mediate disease resistance. This will facilitate development of molecular markers associated with disease resistance which, in turn, will accelerate improvement of walnut rootstocks.

To achieve this goal, we are mapping resistance genes on genetic maps relative to molecular markers. Molecular markers linked to resistance genes will facilitate:

  1. Efficient selection of resistant progeny in interspecific hybrids between wild mother trees and English walnut without pathogen challenge.
  2. Combining resistance against multiple diseases in a single rootstock.
  3. Pyramiding different genes for resistance to the same disease in a single rootstock.
  4. Screening large rootstock populations for most desirable phenotypes.
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