Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement
Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement
Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement
University of California
Walnut Scion & Rootstock Improvement

Micropropagation

INTRODUCTORY TEXT HERE

Micropropagation Methology

Fig. 1. The Micropropagation team.
Fig. 1. The Micropropagation team.
Fig. 2. Making tissue culture medium.
Fig. 2. Making tissue culture medium.
Fig. 3. All tissue culture medium has to be sterilized in an autoclave.
Fig. 3. All tissue culture medium has to be sterilized in an autoclave.

Fig. 4. Young shoots or suckers of seedlings or Mother Trees for introduction to culture.
Fig. 4. Young shoots or suckers of seedlings or Mother Trees for introduction to culture.
Fig. 5. Introduction of full-sib hybrid seed to culture by extraction of immature zygotic embryos.
Fig. 5. Introduction of full-sib hybrid seed to culture by extraction of immature zygotic embryos.
Fig. 6. Shoots cut to single node pieces and washed before sterilizing.
Fig. 6. Shoots cut to single node pieces and washed before sterilizing.

Fig. 7. New material in culture by nodal cuttings.
Fig. 7. New material in culture by nodal cuttings.
Fig. 8. A new nodal cutting beginning to push a bud.
Fig. 8. A new nodal cutting beginning to push a bud.
Fig. 9. New shoot excised from the initial nodal cutting.
Fig. 9. New shoot excised from the initial nodal cutting.

Fig. 10. Beginning to multiply a new shoot recently excised from a nodal cutting.
Fig. 10. Beginning to multiply a new shoot recently excised from a nodal cutting.
Fig. 11. A new genotype just established and now ready to produce shoots for rooting
Fig. 11. A new genotype just established and now ready to produce shoots for rooting
Fig. 12. Micropropagation of full-sib hybrid seed for replicated pathogen resistance testing.
Fig. 12. Micropropagation of full-sib hybrid seed for replicated pathogen resistance testing.

Fig. 13. Micropropagation of potential Mother Trees from nodal cuttings.
Fig. 13. Micropropagation of potential Mother Trees from nodal cuttings.
Fig. 14. Our indoor germplasm collection is available to support commercial labs.
Fig. 14. Our indoor germplasm collection is available to support commercial labs.
Fig. 15. Micropropagation generates plenty of glassware  to be washed and prepared for re-use.
Fig. 15. Micropropagation generates plenty of glassware to be washed and prepared for re-use.

Fig. 16. Temperature and humidty controlled fog chamber for rooting micropropagated shoots.
Fig. 16. Temperature and humidty controlled fog chamber for rooting micropropagated shoots.
Fig. 17. Micropropagated shoots rooting inside one of our fog chambers.
Fig. 17. Micropropagated shoots rooting inside one of our fog chambers.
Fig. 18. Filling ConeTainers with potting soil to plant newly rooted micropropagated shoots.
Fig. 18. Filling ConeTainers with potting soil to plant newly rooted micropropagated shoots.

Fig. 19. Recently planted rooted shoots acclimating in a fog chamber before transfer to a shade bench.
Fig. 19. Recently planted rooted shoots acclimating in a fog chamber before transfer to a shade bench.
Fig. 20. Partially acclimated micropropagated plantlets acclimating on a shade bench.
Fig. 20. Partially acclimated micropropagated plantlets acclimating on a shade bench.
Fig. 21. Repottting acclimatedclonal plantlets to larger pots for Phytophthora resistance trials.
Fig. 21. Repottting acclimatedclonal plantlets to larger pots for Phytophthora resistance trials.

Fig. 22. Re-potting micropropagated plantlets for Phytophthora resistance testing.
Fig. 22. Re-potting micropropagated plantlets for Phytophthora resistance testing.
Fig. 23. Micropropagated plants to be grown further for crown gall resistance testing.
Fig. 23. Micropropagated plants to be grown further for crown gall resistance testing.
Fig. 24. Use of gibberellic acid to elongate micropropagated plants for pathology trials.
Fig. 24. Use of gibberellic acid to elongate micropropagated plants for pathology trials.

Fig. 25. But - use of gibberellic acid in tissue culture medium inhibited shoot growth.
Fig. 25. But - use of gibberellic acid in tissue culture medium inhibited shoot growth.
Fig. 26. Changing the iron chelate and concentration in the medium improved growth of some genotypes.
Fig. 26. Changing the iron chelate and concentration in the medium improved growth of some genotypes.

Webmaster Email: fruitsandnuts@ucdavis.edu